Book Reviews

Review of Heather Wiebe. 2012. Britten’s Unquiet Pasts: Sound and Memory in Postwar Reconstruction. New York: Cambridge University Press

Published Aug 14, 2015

Abstract Britten as a public figure. Britten as a composer of music for children, amateurs, and the church. These are sides of Britten’s legacy that have attracted little scholarly attention prior to Heather Wiebe’s recent monograph Britten’s Unquiet Pasts: Sound and Memory in Postwar Reconstruction. More familiar is Britten as a composer of opera and… Read more

Review of Thomas Emmerig. 1984. Joseph Riepel, 1709-1782, Hofkapellmeister des Fürsten von Thurn und Taxis : Biographie, thematisches Werkverzeichnis, Schriftenverzeichnis. Kallmünz : M. Lassleben

Published Mar 23, 2015

Abstract Thomas Emmerig’s Joseph Riepel (1709-1782): Hifkapellmeister des Fürsten von Thurn und Taxis, volume 14 in the Thurn- und Taxis-Studien, is a welcome work which should be of central significance in the recent revival of interest in the life and work of Joseph Riepel. This relatively small volume (177 pages, including indices) contains a biography… Read more

Review of Leos Faltus, Petr Oliva, eds. 1983. Leoš Janáček. Kritische Gesamtausgabe, Reihe C, Band 1: Männerchöre 1. Kassel: Bärenreiter

Published Mar 23, 2015

Abstract The sixth volume of the Complete Critical Edition of Janacek’s works, consisting of the early unaccompanied male choruses, has recently appeared. This collection, which covers the years 1873 to 1897, takes us from the very beginning of Janacek’s compositional career up to the composition of Jenufa.These are not Janacek’s greatest works in the genre;… Read more

Review of Friederich Erhardt Niedt. 1989. The Musical Guide: Parts 1 (1700/10), 2 (1721), and 3 (1717). New York: Oxford University Press; and Susan P. Snook-Luther, ed. 1992. The Musical Dilettante: A Treatise on Composition by J. F. Daube. New York: Cambridge University Press

Published Mar 23, 2015

Abstract Ever so slowly, English-speaking musicologists are bringing to light important documents of eighteenth-century musical thought in scholarly, annotated translations. Still, when we consider how long the vast corpus of ancient writings on music theory have enjoyed the attention of scholars (Meibom’s “edition” of Greek theory treatises was published, it will be recalled, in 1652),… Read more

Review of Eric Clarke and Nicholas Cook, eds. 2004. Empirical Musicology: Methods, Aims, Prospects. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press

Published Mar 23, 2015

Abstract Empirical Musicology is a collection of articles exploring the potential for a greater integration of empirical methods into musicology and music theory. This volume is particularly timely given the increase in available personal computer power over the past ten years and the subsequent development of software that may be used to extract, analyze, and/or… Read more

Review of Walter Frisch. 2005. German Modernism: Music and the Arts. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press

Published Mar 23, 2015

Abstract Long admired for judicious analysis steeped in history, from Schoenbergian Brahms to Brahmsian Schoenberg, Walter Frisch, in German Modernism: Music and the Arts, topples a historiography in place for at least sixty years. Chapters on ”Ambivalent Modernism” (Parsifal) and “Regressive Modernism” (Pfitzner’s Palestrina) serve as bookends. Reger receives twenty-three pages, Schoenberg four-and those four… Read more

Review of David Charlton. 2000. French Opera 1730-1830: Meaning and Media. Aldershot: Ashgate

Published Mar 23, 2015

Abstract David Charlton’s book is not a single-minded monograph but a collection of essays published in periodicals spread over the last quarter-century. This may explain its somewhat cryptic title; it must have been hard to think of anything more suitable-such as “Collected Essays on Aspects of French Opera”-that would not have been inappropriately bland. Those… Read more

Review of Hervé Lacombe. 2001. The Keys to French Opera in the Nineteenth Century. Translated by Edward Schneider. Berkeley: University of California Press

Published Mar 23, 2015

Abstract Hervé Lacombe’s The Keys to French Opera in the Nineteenth Century, a revised and expanded translation of his Les voies de l’opéra français au XIXe siècle (1997), is a brilliant study that, as the title suggests, provides keys to understanding French opera. Early on, Lacombe argues that nineteenth-century French opera was “governed by a… Read more